12 Ways to Decrease Holiday Stress

Let’s face it. Holidays are stressful. No matter how many years of experience we have going through them, no matter how far we plan ahead, and no matter how hard we try to cut back, the stress is there.

But, it doesn’t have to be an all in, freaking out kind of stress. Or a overwhelming, panicking, losing sleep kind of stress.

How about we shoot for the slightly uncomfortable feeling of having a few extra things on our to-do list for a few weeks and leave it at that kind of stress?

The following list may help you do just that. Good luck and happy holidays!

12 Ways to Decrease Holiday Stress

1. Make space for difficult feelings like grief.

2. Create your own holiday traditions.

3. Set realistic expectations for yourself and the holiday.

4. Stick to your self-care routine.

5. Give yourself permission to let it be a normal day.

6. Make a plan and try to stick to it. Staying organized is key.

7. Learn to say ‘no’ without feeling guilty.

8. Shop online and stick to a budget.

9. Set boundaries with family and friends.

10. Avoid excess alcohol.

11. Stay active with exercise.

12. Ask for help.

Resources: Eli’s Place, Health Point, Blessing Manifesting

10 Ways to Lower Stress

With the holidays bearing down on us I thought this would be a good time to talk about things we could do to lower our stress levels. Here are just several ideas.

  1. Breathe deeply
  2. Exercise
  3. Go for a walk
  4. Smell pleasant aromas
  5. Close your eyes and think of a happy moment
  6. Rub fingers together to take attention away from a negative thought
  7. Be in nature
  8. Call a drama-free person
  9. Drink chamomile tea
  10. Be grateful for life

What are some more ways you use to lower your stress?

Resource: no longer available

10 Common Signs of Depression versus 10 Hidden Signs of Depression

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Depression can present itself in many different ways.  Some common signs of depression include the following.

  1. sadness, loneliness, or emptiness
  2. loss of interest in things normally enjoyed
  3. tiredness and chronic low energy
  4. difficulty thinking clearly, concentrating, making decisions or remembering
  5. feelings of worthlessness and guilt
  6. irritability, frustration or anger
  7. restlessness and agitation
  8. sleep disturbances
  9. change of appetite
  10. recurrent thoughts of death or suicide

There is also something called hidden depression or “functional depression” where the individual with depression may not experience the common signs of depression, but the depression manifests itself it other, less obvious, ways, such as the following.

  1. perfectionism with a constant, critical inner voice
  2. heightened or excessive sense of responsibility
  3. difficulty with accepting and expressing painful emotions
  4. worry or need for control over self and environment
  5. intense focus on tasks, using accomplishments as a way to feel valuable
  6. active concern about the well-being of others, while not allowing anyone into his inner world
  7. discounts or dismisses hurt or abuse from the past, or the present
  8. accompanying mental health issues involving control or escape from anxiety
  9. a strong belief in “counting your blessings” as the foundation of well-being
  10. intimate relationships may be difficult, but are accompanied by professional success.

If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself lasting more than a few weeks, please talk to your doctor about them.  Depression is a real illness and is not something we can wish away or control by will power alone.  Get the help you need so you can live the life you were meant to have.

Source: rtor.org

4 Areas Affected by Depression

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Depression affects the whole person.  Not just our thoughts, not just our emotions, not just our behavior.  It affects everything, including our physical body as well.

In a nutshell, below is how depression may present itself in these four areas.

  1. THOUGHTS
  • self-criticism
  • impaired memory
  • indecisiveness
  • confusion
  • thoughts of death and suicide

2.  EMOTIONS

  • sadness
  • anxiety
  • guilt
  • anger
  • mood swings
  • irritability

3.  BEHAVIOR

  • withdrawal from others
  • neglect of responsibilities
  • changes in personal appearance

4.  PHYSICAL

  • chronic fatigue
  • lack of energy
  • sleeping too much or too little
  • weight gain or loss
  • loss of motivation
  • substance abuse

If you recognize these symptoms of depression in you or someone you care about, talk to a doctor about it.  There is help for those who suffer from depression.  I am one of those people.  It is not the end of the world.  There is life beyond depression.  It does go away.  Getting through it until it is gone is what you need help with.  I can share my experience with you via my Facebook page here.  Or feel free to comment below.

 

Symptoms and Behaviors of People with Social Anxiety Disorder

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Social anxiety disorder is an anxiety disorder that causes people to be fearful of social situations where they might be embarrassed or judged.  Psychological symptoms include self-consciousness when around other people, excessive worry about upcoming events where interaction will be expected, avoidance of places or events where people gather, and difficultly making friends and maintaining friendships.  Physical symptoms include excessive sweating, difficultly speaking or catching one’s breath, a sensation of flushing, trembling or uncontrollable shaking, and nausea.

There are many behaviors people with social anxiety may do or not do in an attempt to cope with the overwhelming anxiety this disorder produces such as not talking because of being afraid of being judged, not being able to go anywhere alone, staying inside all day, hating when the teacher calls on you in class, avoiding eye contact with others, avoiding eating in front of others, counting money before you pay, not leaving voicemails, not asking for help when you need it, always preparing what to say ahead of time, being worried about running into people you know, going to the bathroom to escape, using a phone or some other crutch to avoid people, dwelling on a small awkward moment for much longer than necessary, never going to any social event without a person that makes you feel comfortable and following said person way too much, worrying about the person beginning to find you obnoxious, and faking an illness to get out of a social event.

Have you done any of these behaviors to deal with social anxiety?  How else do you cope with your social anxiety?  What are some positive ways to cope with social anxiety disorder?

Reference: socialanxietydisorder.net

Signs of Overthinking and What to Do About It

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Thinking about things is good, right? When we have important decisions to make we have to think about them before committing one way or another to ensure we are making the correct decision. We have to weigh the pros and cons, ask others for advice, sleep on it; you know, think about it. After all, thinking is one of the main things that distinguishes us from the rest of the animal kingdom.

Does there come a time, however, when thinking becomes a liability to our well being? I believe there does.

Signs of Overthinking

  • second guessing everything
  • analyzing things to death
  • expecting the worst
  • having insomnia
  • hating to make decisions
  • would rather someone else decide things for you
  • regretting things often
  • have a hard time letting things go
  • taking things personally
  • being a perfectionist
  • criticizing yourself a lot
  • never feeling one hundred percent certain
  • feeling tense
  • feeling like you can’t turn your brain off

What to do if you are overthinking

  • Journal – writing down your thoughts can sometimes take them out of your head and keep them out. It is worth a try.
  • Talk to someone about your thoughts – again the idea is to get the thoughts out of your head. The longer you keep them bottled up, the longer they will just swirl around in there.
  • Use positive distractions – engage in a creative hobby, something that gains your entire focus so you are no longer thinking about anything else except for the task at hand. Sometimes our thoughts just need to be interrupted by action, whether we feel like taking that action or not.

Are you an overthinker? I am. What do you do to deal with it? Leave a comment or message me on my Facebook page here.

References: