What is a Mixed State in Bipolar Disorder?

dave-francis-Vs02NnPZbsI-unsplashBipolar disorder usually consists of moods alternating between extreme highs, or semi-highs in the case of hypomania, and extreme lows, with stabilized moods in between.  The highs can include symptoms such as:

  • Having lots of energy
  • Feeling high or wired
  • Having racing thoughts
  • Talking fast
  • Taking more risks
  • Needing less sleep than usual to feel rested
  • Having more distractions than usual
  • Having intense senses, such as smell and touch (Source: WebMD)

The lows can include symptoms such as:

  • Feeling sad, anxious, or empty
  • Feeling hopeless or pessimistic
  • Feeling guilty, worthless, or helpless
  • Not enjoying things you used to enjoy
  • Trouble with concentration, memory, or making decisions
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Appetite changes
  • Gaining or losing weight
  • Feeling restless or irritable
  • Thoughts of suicide or death (Source: WebMD)

A person experiencing a mixed episode is having symptoms from the highs and the lows at the same time or in rapid succession with no break in between.  This is a very disturbing type of episode to have and can cause much confusion and anxiety for the person.  The person can, for example, feel depressed and tired most of the day with no motivation or hope, but still feel compelled to act out impulsively with regards to sex or spending money at times.  They can be crying uncontrollably one minute and extremely happy the next.  This can go on for days, weeks, or months.

Treatment usually includes some form of medication.  Treatment by a doctor is definitely required as this is something that will not go away on its own and if left untreated carries an extremely high risk of ending in self-harm or suicide.  Mixed episodes in particular are even more at risk of suicide than straight bipolar mania or depressive episodes alone.

The good news is with medication management by a qualified doctor these episodes can be arrested and a safe, healthy, happy life can be attained even with a life-time diagnosis of bipolar disorder.  I am living proof of that.

Comments are always open for questions regarding my experience with bipolar disorder and how I’ve learned to manage and live positively with it after being diagnosed almost 15 years ago.